Posts Tagged ‘Fat Loss’

The goal of simultaneously building muscle and shedding body fat is tricky.

But, yes it can be done.

With a smart and sound plan, it’s possible.

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1. Consistency reigns supreme

 

Perhaps the most obvious out of the bunch, steady improvements in your body composition requires discipline and consistency — it doesn’t happen overnight.

Admittedly, there were times I felt completely drained and burnt out, but the thought of having to start all over again was just bone-numbingly painful. Rather than taking long breaks or pressing the pause button, consider turning the dial down. This ensures you maintain a respectable amount of work while still moving in the right direction.

Never stop. You can slow down a bit, but don’t stop.

Taking intermittent sabbaticals leads you nowhere. Moreover, nobody likes the idea of taking one step forward and two steps back.

Rest assured the ones who are making steady gains are the ones who train consistently.

2. Use high ROI exercises

 

There is absolutely nothing wrong with novelty.

Think about it, there’s a reason why compound movements such as the squat, deadlift, pull-ups, and push-ups are the cornerstone of most sensible programs — they’re tried and true.

It stimulates your entire body.

It’s not the end-all be-all approach, but you’re ahead of the curve once you start mastering the basics.

Every exercise serves a purposes, but for the mean time, leave the BOSU ball and “functional” training out of this.

Simplicity, not complexity. ‘Nuff said.

3. Nutrition and lifestyle must take precedence.

 

This is hardly groundbreaking, but for whatever reason many just don’t get it. I understand the rationale behind working out so you can eat what ever you want, but the work you put in will be rendered useless with destructive eating habits. In other words, stop eating — and drinking — so much crap.

A good training program is equally important, but you can’t expect magical things to happen because even the best method in the world will not offset poor nutrition.

Make better choices.

Instead of the typical trip to Starbucks for breakfast, blend up a protein shake. Have a few meals prepped and ready to avoid making poor food choices.

I’m not advocating that you should be perfect, but you won’t get the results you’re looking for if you don’t take this part seriously.

4. Train with a purpose

 

You’re obviously not going to produce substantial gains just going through the motions. To some degree, your workout has to bring you to a point where you almost start to question your sanity. Put simply, it kind of has to suck (in a good way).

I’m not saying you have to constantly beat yourself up, but training with a purpose goes a long way.

So, work your ass off.

As a point of reference, the main reason why I make it a priority to get in a workout is because I want to look and feel good. Also, I don’t want to have to take medication as I get older.

5. Recovery matters

 

For years, I was convinced that more training equates to faster results.

Boy was I wrong.

Unless you’ve been injected with the super solider serum, it’s highly unlikely that you’ll achieve optimal results with that approach.

All you do in the gym is break your body down.

Your training is only as good as your ability to recover from it.

I’m excited to announce that I’ll be launching my first product, Assault, soon. If you’re interested in getting the most out of training to build lean muscle and shed body fat, get a FREE preview HERE before it comes out.

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One of the things I try to impress upon for folks who’s primary goal is fat loss is the importance of daily movement (and, of course, nutrition). It’s no question that what you do in the gym pales in comparison to what you do the other 23 hours of the day. 

It’s virtually impossible to quantify any result if you spend half, if not, most of your day sitting down.

Here’s the easiest exercise you can start doing today:

It’s really simple: Go for a walk

 

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Today, seemingly, everyone falls prey to the notion that exercise has to be gritty and hardcore. Granted, to a degree you have to strain your body if you want to make significant changes (you’re delusional if you think otherwise). And, while it may not be as impactful as lifting weights, make no mistake that walking every day does wonders for the body.

Many discount the value of walking because they feel the need to go 100% all the time. Being partial to one method or scheme doesn’t pan out well. You can gain a lot of benefits by working both sides of the training spectrum.

Of the many benefits, the biggest one I want to outline is improved nutrient partitioning. This basically means that your body becomes more efficient at utilizing the foods you eat — improved digestion, improved insulin sensitivity = fat loss machine.

Don’t complicate things. Aim for 30-40 minutes every day.

A simple way to put this into action is to walk 15-20 minutes after every meal.

Workout Of The Month

Workout of the month with @jtsuji5. #StrengthTraining #Honolulu #Hawaii #jiujitsu #kajukenbo

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1. You can follow a well-designed training program to a T, but if you’re not doing the simple things such as drinking enough water and getting adequate rest, you’re just spinning your wheels.

2. It’s going to be hard, and it’s going to suck — there’s no easy way around it. Welcome and embrace the suck factor. Balance is to be appreciated, but recognize that to a certain extent you’re going to have to trend further away from that to get the desired result you’re looking for. Nothing amazing ever happens by staying in the middle. If you want to make significant changes in your appearance, suck it up.

I’m not saying you should suffer, but it’s foolish to think that it shouldn’t be difficult.

3. It’s a clear observation that completely disregarding the importance of proper nutrition is foolish, to say the least.  Look, I get it — it’s incredibly hard. But consider how many benefits have the potential to dramatically improve your physique and performance if your diet was on point.  Understand that there is a trade-off and you have to exercise serious discipline (not restriction).

4. At the risk of ruffling feathers, most folks would see promising results if they mitigated liquid calories (juices, alcohol, etc.) and increased their daily protein intake.

5. Progress takes time to manifest, and it’s no different than cooking up a fine meal in the kitchen. Don’t rush it. Be patient.

6. How many calories you burn in a workout pales in comparison to what you do the other 22-23 hours during the day. With that in mind, a lot who struggle to get lean overlook the value of daily activity.

As a frame of reference, my activity level is pretty darn high when you factor in my own training, and the hours I spend coaching my clients.  It’s the very reason why I have to eat a substantial amount of high quality calories in order to maintain my body composition. Now compare that to someone who works at a desk all day.

Get up, and get more movement in.

7.  Your environment can overwhelm you if you’re trying to improve your approach on the nutrition front. So, if you find yourself always hopping on and off the horse, you need to do a better job of preparing your meals ahead of time.

8. We all have our trigger foods. We tell ourselves just a few bites, but they’re just too irresistible. As much as I love pizza, it doesn’t give me a solid ROI in terms of having a positive outcome on health and body composition because I just end up eating the whole box.  There’s no guilt, but that’s just way too many calories. If you can’t control your portions, look into the possibility of cutting it out (for the time being).

9. It doesn’t matter what training protocol you do. You can’t out-train a destructive lifestyle. Regardless of the training method, all you’re doing is breaking your body down.  What you do outside is going to dictate your results. If you live for the weekends, you’re not going to get anything in return.  Yes, there are people who can get away with eating crap, and getting minimal rest. But, there is a tipping point.

Good intentions and justifying yourself on social media doesn’t mean much. Consider the different elements in your lifestyle that are a hindrance. Work to gradually change them and in turn, you’ll maximize results in the gym.

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