Posts Tagged ‘Muscle Building’

I can tell you from firsthand experience, it’s not easy packing on pounds of lean muscle mass.

As someone who has struggled mightily in the past, I know a thing or two about a thing or two.

In an effort to save you years of frustration, here are some guidelines you oughta follow.

No fluff, no quackery, no-nonsense.

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1. Consistency trumps intensity

 

If you’re a complete newbie, provided you stay consistent, those gains will come quick.

Once your body has become fully aware of the physical demands you’re putting it through, that’s where things start to become increasingly difficult — you have less room for error.

If there’s only one thing you can takeaway from this, it’s that you have to remain consistent. 

You need to train hard, and you need to do it often for a long time.

As much as it has to do with exercise selection or whatever program you’re following, showing up 3-4 days, 52 weeks out of the year is what’s going to make a difference.

As long there’s a level of progression, good things will happen.

2. Learn to love the basics

 

There’s nothing inherently wrong with variety or wanting to change things up. I’ve done it numerous times in the past, and still do so from time to time.

However, the perception that you HAVE to constantly “switch it up” is complete horse sh*t.

The body is amazingly adaptive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you need to find a new exercise to do every time you hit the gym.

Get strong at the basics, and learn to love them because they work. You’re not going to change your body doing curls or squats on a BOSU ball.

3.  Cardio is important, but prioritize lifting

 

Everybody will have their own opinion on how much cardio should one do. It’s a never ending debate.

Fact is, I’m not anti-cardio. There are a host of benefits by regularly training in an aerobic environment, and I think it’s a big mistake by not doing any cardio whatsoever.

However, if done in excess, that’s when it starts to interfere with strength and muscle gain.

Most people struggling to gain lean muscle mass, seemingly, fall into the trap of doing too much cardio.

I know I’ve been guilty of it.

For instance, if you’re always starting your workout with a one mile run, it’s going to have a negative impact because you’re expending most of your energy on the activity that’s not going to give you the biggest return.

If you want to optimize strength and muscular development, prioritize resistance training. Keep the cardio to a minimum. Don’t take things out of context, though. If you’re goal is primarily fat loss, don’t even think about skipping cardio.

Other Tidbits:

 

– Subpar nutrition can and will neutralize the best training. Don’t blame the program, blame the incessant need to stuff yourself with cupcakes, donuts and copious amounts of your favorite cocktail/alcoholic beverage.

– You don’t need to train borderline crazy to get quality results. Don’t overdo it. Your training is only as good as your ability to recover.

– Getting to bed on time, drinking more water, and eating your veggies are all the detoxification you need — and it sure does make a huge difference.

– If you’re truly pressed for time, always remember it’s better to get in something than nothing. Don’t play devil’s advocate and come up with reasons why you can’t do it. Make it a priority to get it done.

 

If you’re looking for a training resource that’s revolved around getting the most out of your workouts without wasting your time, I’ll be launching my new digital product on the 28th.

Check it out by clicking the link below.

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>>Assault<<

The goal of simultaneously building muscle and shedding body fat is tricky.

But, yes it can be done.

With a smart and sound plan, it’s possible.

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1. Consistency reigns supreme

 

Perhaps the most obvious out of the bunch, steady improvements in your body composition requires discipline and consistency — it doesn’t happen overnight.

Admittedly, there were times I felt completely drained and burnt out, but the thought of having to start all over again was just bone-numbingly painful. Rather than taking long breaks or pressing the pause button, consider turning the dial down. This ensures you maintain a respectable amount of work while still moving in the right direction.

Never stop. You can slow down a bit, but don’t stop.

Taking intermittent sabbaticals leads you nowhere. Moreover, nobody likes the idea of taking one step forward and two steps back.

Rest assured the ones who are making steady gains are the ones who train consistently.

2. Use high ROI exercises

 

There is absolutely nothing wrong with novelty.

Think about it, there’s a reason why compound movements such as the squat, deadlift, pull-ups, and push-ups are the cornerstone of most sensible programs — they’re tried and true.

It stimulates your entire body.

It’s not the end-all be-all approach, but you’re ahead of the curve once you start mastering the basics.

Every exercise serves a purposes, but for the mean time, leave the BOSU ball and “functional” training out of this.

Simplicity, not complexity. ‘Nuff said.

3. Nutrition and lifestyle must take precedence.

 

This is hardly groundbreaking, but for whatever reason many just don’t get it. I understand the rationale behind working out so you can eat what ever you want, but the work you put in will be rendered useless with destructive eating habits. In other words, stop eating — and drinking — so much crap.

A good training program is equally important, but you can’t expect magical things to happen because even the best method in the world will not offset poor nutrition.

Make better choices.

Instead of the typical trip to Starbucks for breakfast, blend up a protein shake. Have a few meals prepped and ready to avoid making poor food choices.

I’m not advocating that you should be perfect, but you won’t get the results you’re looking for if you don’t take this part seriously.

4. Train with a purpose

 

You’re obviously not going to produce substantial gains just going through the motions. To some degree, your workout has to bring you to a point where you almost start to question your sanity. Put simply, it kind of has to suck (in a good way).

I’m not saying you have to constantly beat yourself up, but training with a purpose goes a long way.

So, work your ass off.

As a point of reference, the main reason why I make it a priority to get in a workout is because I want to look and feel good. Also, I don’t want to have to take medication as I get older.

5. Recovery matters

 

For years, I was convinced that more training equates to faster results.

Boy was I wrong.

Unless you’ve been injected with the super solider serum, it’s highly unlikely that you’ll achieve optimal results with that approach.

All you do in the gym is break your body down.

Your training is only as good as your ability to recover from it.

I’m excited to announce that I’ll be launching my first product, Assault, soon. If you’re interested in getting the most out of training to build lean muscle and shed body fat, get a FREE preview HERE before it comes out.

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